Microsoft Using Chromium to Enhance Edge, Not Replace It

UPDATE: After all the hubbub over this issue over the last few days, Microsoft’s Joe Belfiore has penned a blog post to better communicate his company’s direction for Microsoft Edge.

See: Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration

This communication falls directly in line with what we reported originally. New bits include that Microsoft will make this revamped Edge available for Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and Mac. It will also be updated more regularly than Windows 10. This piece is a “has-to” component for Microsoft. There’s no other way to do it since Chromium is updated so regularly.

Original article…

According to sources, the news that Microsoft is replacing its Windows 10 browser, Edge, isn’t quite as accurate as many think. Based on an article that WindowsCentral.com originally ran, it seemed like Microsoft would do a wholesale replacement of Edge with something more Chrome-like.

Instead, sources within Microsoft have clarified that there is no current plan to create a new browser or do away with Microsoft Edge. Instead, the company will use what Chrome/Chromium does well to enhance Edge to make it work better and be more compatible with the web. The hope is that by doing so, Windows users will opt to use the default browser instead of having to look elsewhere. Customers often complain about Edge’s compatibility problems. In some cases, Microsoft’s own software doesn’t even work right with Edge.

There are many browsers already based on Chromium, that are not Chrome. For example, the popular web browser Vivaldi supports Chrome extensions directly but serves up a plethora of additional, built-in features not available using Chrome.

So, it’s likely that Edge will retain its name, just bring to Windows users the features that make Google’s Chrome such a dominating app.