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Patch Management / Patch Tuesday / Windows 10

Microsoft Delivers a May 1st Surprise Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Microsoft Delivers a May 1st Surprise Update for Windows 10 Version 1809
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Depending on how positive you want to start the month of May, Microsoft has kicked off the the month with a cumulative update for Windows 10 1809.

Here’s what’s fixed:

  • Addresses an issue that prevents the CALDATETIME structure from handling more than four Japanese Eras. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Updates the NLS registry to support the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the DateTimePicker to display the date incorrectly in the Japanese date format. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the Date and Time Settings control to cache old Eras and prevents the control from refreshing when the time enters the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Updates fonts to support the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that prevents an input method editor (IME) from supporting the new Japanese Era character. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue that causes the Clock and Calendar flyout control to display the day of the week incorrectly mapped to a date in the month of the new Japanese Era. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Adds alternative fonts for the new Japanese Era fonts. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Enables Text-To-Speech (TTS) functionality to support new Japanese Era characters. For more information, see KB4469068.
  • Addresses an issue in Unified Write Filter (UWF) that prevents Hibernate Once/Resume Many (HORM) from working as expected on Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) systems.

The update doesn’t address most of what the company left open-ended from April, but this update represents a growing precedent of having to go back and fixing Japanese-specific problems separately.

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