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Developer / Microsoft Edge

Did Google Sabotage the Web to Force Developers to Adopt Chromium?

Did Google Sabotage the Web to Force Developers to Adopt Chromium?

Microsoft was the latest company to announce that it would veer away from its current web browser developer platform and instead begin adopting Chromium. Chromium is an open source platform to ensure a more compatible web, however, it should be noted that even though it’s under the category of “open source,” Google owns the project and can have veto power over anything submitted.

Microsoft’s announcement is a big one and leaves only Firefox as a major web browser still developing outside of Chromium. Hints of Microsoft Edge’s new Chromium-based nuances should start to filter out for testing in early 2019.

But, one ex-Edge engineer says that its possible that Google sabotaged pieces of the web to deviously force web browser makers to adopt Chromium.

“For example, they may start integrating technologies for which they have exclusive, or at least ‘special’ access. Can you imagine if all of a sudden Google apps start performing better than anyone else’s?”

This is already happening. I very recently worked on the Edge team, and one of the reasons we decided to end EdgeHTML was because Google kept making changes to its sites that broke other browsers, and we couldn’t keep up. For example, they recently added a hidden empty div over YouTube videos that causes our hardware acceleration fast-path to bail (should now be fixed in Win10 Oct update). Prior to that, our fairly state-of-the-art video acceleration put us well ahead of Chrome on video playback time on battery, but almost the instant they broke things on YouTube, they started advertising Chrome’s dominance over Edge on video-watching battery life. What makes it so sad, is that their claimed dominance was not due to ingenious optimization work by Chrome, but due to a failure of YouTube. On the whole, they only made the web slower.

Now while I’m not sure I’m convinced that YouTube was changed intentionally to slow Edge, many of my co-workers are quite convinced – and they’re the ones who looked into it personally. To add to this all, when we asked, YouTube turned down our request to remove the hidden empty div and did not elaborate further.

And this is only one case.

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