January 2019 Patch Tuesday Update for Windows 10 1803 Prohibits Pinning Web Links

Microsoft has begun to deliver its security updates for exposed bugs for its regular Patch Tuesday for January 2019. In doing so, Windows 10 1803 comes with an annoyance that users should be aware of:

After installing this update, some users cannot pin a web link on the Start menu or the taskbar.

Microsoft is working on a fix and promises to deliver this fix sometime near the end of January.

Windows 10 Patch Tuesday Updates Come with Inability to Authenticate Hotspots

UPDATE: Microsoft has now solved this issue through new updates for Windows 10 1803, 1709 and 1703.

Original article…

Microsoft today is delivering its Patch Tuesday updates for the various products suffering from security woes. However, those that want to deploy the updates for Windows 10 right away, may want to hold off and test.

All supported versions of Windows 10 come with the following bug:

After installing this update, third-party applications may have difficulty authenticating hotspots.

Microsoft is working on a resolution and estimates a solution will be available late January.

Incidentally, this issue also affects Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012, Windows Embedded 8 Standard.

Microsoft Kicks Off a Year of Patches with Non-security Updates for Office

Microsoft continues to roll unimpeded with its update strategy as the first-Tuesday updates for Office are now available.

Here’s what to expect:

Office 2010

Update for Microsoft Excel 2010 (KB4461627)
Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB4032217)
Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB4032225)
Update for Microsoft Office 2010 (KB4461616)


Office 2013

Update for Microsoft Project 2013 (KB4461560)
Update for Skype for Business 2015 (KB4461557)


Office 2016

Update for Skype for Business 2016 (KB4461586)
Update for Microsoft Excel 2016 (KB4461600)
Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB3203480)
Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB4032230)
Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB4461435)
Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB4461533)
Update for Microsoft Project 2016 (KB4461587)
Update for Microsoft Visio 2016 (KB4461531)

Microsoft Preps January Update to Resolve Another Windows 10 1809 Bug that Disables an Admin Account

Originally released on October 2018, the glory of Windows 10 1809 continues to plague customers into 2019.

In a Microsoft Japanese blog post, Microsoft has confirmed an issue for blocking an Admin account when upgrading from Windows 10 1803 to Windows 10 1809.

Until a fix is ready (possibly this month), Microsoft suggests creating a second Admin account and using that prior to upgrading…

…if you need to upgrade before the patch is released, please confirm that you can surely sign in with a user with administrative privileges other than the built-in administrator, before you upgrade Please do 

However, if you’ve already upgraded and have been bitten by the bug, do this…

…if you have already upgraded and you have invalidated the built-in Administrator, you are signed in as a user with administrator privileges other than the built-in Administrator, activate the built-in Administrator.

Microsoft Fixes Outlook Update that Broke Rules and Alerts in November

Microsoft has just released an update for Outlook 2016 users that are affected by the bug the company introduced in November.

Full details here: November Security Update for Outlook Breaks the Ability to Manage Rules & Alerts Still Today

The update is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions and available from Microsoft’s Download Center.

December 17 Marks Microsoft’s Official Re-re-release Date for Windows 10 October Update

If you watch the communities, customers have been asking if Windows 10 1809 is yet safe for consumption for a couple of months. Windows 10 1809 might go down as Microsoft’s worst update since Windows 10 began back rolling out to customers in July 2015. This nightmarish update revealed new bugs almost weekly and Microsoft eventually had to pause the delivery.

On December 17, 2018, the company finally put the stamp of approval back on the update. From the Windows 10 Update History page:

Rollout Status as of December 17, 2018: Windows 10, version 1809, is now fully available for advanced users who manually select “Check for updates” via Windows Update. 

The update history page still cites four upgrade blocks that are in place.  Those include Cisco AMP for Endpoints,  Intel display drivers, F5 VPN clients, Trend Micro’s OfficeScan, and  AMD Radeon HD2000 or HD4000 series video cards.

Despite these upgrade blocks, Microsoft still believes Windows 10 1809 is ready for prime time. But is it? We should soon find out. It was customers that uncovered the bugs before, and now with more customers available for testing, things could still get interesting.

Microsoft Clarifies “C” and “D” Releases as Optional Updates

In a recent blog post-Microsoft introduced many to its “C” and “D” releases (see: Windows monthly security and quality updates overview). These releases are essentially for those tasked with testing updates for their company. Included in these updates are non-security components that will show up in the next Patch Tuesday full update (Microsoft labels this as the “B” release). Normal users – or, for clarity, those that don’t manually check for updates – will never see the “C” and “D” releases. Only those that go into Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update and click the “Check for updates” box will be presented with these particular updates.

So, essentially, if you don’t want to be a guinea pig for updates, don’t manually check for updates. Manually checking for updates, opts you into beta testing Patch Tuesday updates and can have a negative impact.

However, despite the attempt at clarity, Microsoft missed a couple points in the blog post. Particularly, customers wondered how these updates were considered “optional” and why anyone would want to install them.

Microsoft’s John Wilcox says this

You are correct, with Windows 10, all releases, Quality and Feature are cumulative, so subsequent releases are built on and contain all previous releases. 

To minimize end-user reboot disruption, most of our self managed customers, and as default for the devices we manage, configure to update once a month, to get the latest security patches. These are the B releases.

We refer to the “C” and “D” releases as “optional” because”

  • They only include quality fixes, not security fixes and therefore don’t have the zero-day exposure implications.
  • The fixes will come to you in the next “B” release, which is what we and most of you are focused on getting quickly installed when they come out. So unless there is a specific fix that you’re blocked on, and thus need quickly, you will get the improvements with the next “B”, along with the new security fixes, and then only have on reboot. 

“C” and “D” are there too so that if you want, you can deploy them early with your first flighting rings and have data and visibility to the changes before deploying the “B” release.

The fixes themselves are not optional, as you correctly called out, we only have cumulative updates now, but the specific update package that you deploy to get a set of fixes, and when is optional. 

Microsoft Fixes Intune Non-compliance Problem with Windows 10 1803 Devices

A recent bug introduced by a Microsoft update cause computers running Windows 10 1803 to be reported as non-compliant. In doing so, these devices could not access corporate resources.

Microsoft has solved this issue in this month’s Patch Tuesday update for Windows 10 1803.

  • Addresses an issue with Microsoft Intune that causes devices to be incorrectly marked as not compliant because a firewall incorrectly returns a ‘Poor’ status. As a result, the affected devices will not receive conditional access compliance approval and may be blocked from access to corporate resources such as email.

 

Microsoft Solves Surface Book 2 Bluescreens with Patch Tuesday Update

Microsoft today has rolled out its normal monthly security updates. Among those, the company has also fixed an issue where Surface Book 2 devices (and some non-Microsoft devices) would bluescreen periodically. The issue forced Microsoft to remove the original update that caused the problem completely.

The update that solves the problem is:  December 11, 2018—KB4471324 (OS Build 17134.471)

This is the update for Windows 10 1803.

Known Issues with Windows Cumulative Updates for December Patch Tuesday

As you’re deploying the cumulative security updates for the various Windows 10 versions, you will want to keep in mind some minor annoyances built into this latest round of updates.

Here’s what you can expect…

Windows 10, version 1809

No known issues

Windows 10, version 1803

After you install the August Preview of Quality Rollup or September 11, 2018 .NET Framework update, instantiation of SqlConnection can throw an exception. For more information about this issue, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 4470809 SqlConnection instantiation exception on .NET 4.6 and later after August-September 2018 .NET Framework updates. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

After installing this update, some users cannot pin a web link on the Startmenu or the taskbar. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

Windows 10, version 1709

After you install the August Preview of Quality Rollup or September 11, 2018 .NET Framework update, instantiation of SqlConnection can throw an exception. For more information about this issue, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 4470809 SqlConnection instantiation exception on .NET 4.6 and later after August-September 2018 .NET Framework updates. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

Windows 10 version, 1703

After you install the August Preview of Quality Rollup or September 11, 2018 .NET Framework update, instantiation of SqlConnection can throw an exception. For more information about this issue, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 4470809 SqlConnection instantiation exception on .NET 4.6 and later after August-September 2018 .NET Framework updates. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

Windows 10, version 1607 and Windows Server 2016

After you install the August Preview of Quality Rollup or September 11, 2018 .NET Framework update, instantiation of SqlConnection can throw an exception. For more information about this issue, see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base: 4470809 SqlConnection instantiation exception on .NET 4.6 and later after August-September 2018 .NET Framework updates. Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1

After you apply this update, the network interface controller may stop working on some client software configurations. This occurs because of an issue related to a missing file, oem<number>.inf. The exact problematic configurations are currently unknown.

  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc. It may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.
    • Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and choosing Update. Then choose Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

Microsoft Fixes Windows 10 1809’s Windows Media Player Problem with December Patch Tuesday Update

One lingering bug for Windows 10 1809 is an issue where the use of the Seek Bar in Windows Media Player is prevented when playing a specific file.

Per today’s cumulative update for Windows 10 1809, Microsoft has communicated this issue is solved (in addition to specific security bugs fixed):

  • Addresses an issue that may prevent the use of the Seek Bar in Windows Media Player when playing specific files. This issue does not affect normal playback.
  • Security updates to Windows Authentication, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Microsoft Graphics Component, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows Wireless Networking, Windows Kernel, Microsoft Edge, and Microsoft Scripting Engine.